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Found 11 results

  1. Xbox One's best-seller title Dead Rising 3, published and developed by Capcom, seems to be coming to Valve's PC service Steam according to a brief mistake on the Steam Database. Microsoft might finally be fulfilling Phil Spencer's goal of branching out to Windows platforms more, and to top with one of the Xbox One's most acclaimed launch titles. According to a Steam Database leak spotted by a Neogaf.com user, Dead Rising 3 will be arriving on Steam. This should basically confirm the title's jump to Steam, but we're left to wonder whether the timed exclusivity deal ended and Dead Rising 3 will also be ported to the PlayStation 4 or if it's staying as a Microsoft exclusive in the way Titanfall did. This could definitely boost the insane amount of copies already sold at 1.2 Million according to a results sheet dating back to March. Dead Rising isn't particularly known for being a Microsoft exclusive either way, as Dead Rising 2 was available on PS3 as well as the Xbox 360. Do you want Capcom to branch out and launch the game on Steam and PlayStation 4? Let me know below, be sure to discuss, and thanks for reading! UPDATE: Capcom has confirmed a PC release in Summer of 2014 on Steam and in retail thanks to a trailer released on IGN's YouTube.com. Credits to Caboose the Ace for posting this below! This post has been promoted to an article
  2. Xbox One's best-seller title Dead Rising 3, published and developed by Capcom, seems to be coming to Valve's PC service Steam according to a brief mistake on the Steam Database. Microsoft might finally be fulfilling Phil Spencer's goal of branching out to Windows platforms more, and to top with one of the Xbox One's most acclaimed launch titles. According to a Steam Database leak spotted by a Neogaf.com user, Dead Rising 3 will be arriving on Steam. This should basically confirm the title's jump to Steam, but we're left to wonder whether the timed exclusivity deal ended and Dead Rising 3 will also be ported to the PlayStation 4 or if it's staying as a Microsoft exclusive in the way Titanfall did. This could definitely boost the insane amount of copies already sold at 1.2 Million according to a results sheet dating back to March. Dead Rising isn't particularly known for being a Microsoft exclusive either way, as Dead Rising 2 was available on PS3 as well as the Xbox 360. View attachment: dead_rising_3_game-wide.jpg Do you want Capcom to branch out and launch the game on Steam and PlayStation 4? Let me know below, be sure to discuss, and thanks for reading!
  3. Paul Pepera, a graphic artist, who recently worked for 343 Studios continues his career at Valve. He has not only produced some of the more memorable works incorporated into Halo 4, but has also worked on Red Orchestra 2 - Heroes of Stalingrad a Tripwire Interactive title and Section 8 - Prejudice a Time Gate Studios title and id Software. Here is a story by Luke Plunkett of Kokatu. Thanks for all your creative work Paul! Having Helped Build Halo 4, He's Now Building Worlds At Valve by : Luke Plunkett/Kokatu I like to think of Paul Pepera's art as the realisation of childhood dreams. Rendering what we imagined our LEGO constructions to be in our heads, not as they actually looked, all clunky and basic and sharp. Now an artist at Valve, Pepera has also worked at places like 343 Studios, id Software and Timegate, on projects such as Halo 4, Section 8 and Red Orchestra 2. There's a selection of his 3D work below, but to see more you can head to his personal site and CGHub page.
  4. Linux Based OS For The TV and Living Room "As we’ve been working on bringing Steam to the living room, we’ve come to the conclusion that the environment best suited to delivering value to customers is an operating system built around Steam itself. SteamOS combines the rock-solid architecture of Linux with a gaming experience built for the big screen. It will be available soon as a free stand-alone operating system for living room machines." - Says Valve This will allow steam to have: Better Graphics Processing - "Game Developers" are already availing themselves to these performance perks "as they target SteamOS for their new releases" You can Stream games from you Windows or Mac system to a SteamOS machine. You will also be able to stream "Music, TV, and Movies" - Valve Says it's "working with many of the media services you know and love." No names yet but we can assume they want to compete with Roku/AppleTV. Plus "Family Sharing" - Announced a few weeks ago, Valve plans to let you have up to 10 friends (you choose) whom can each access your paid games and get their own achievements and their own save slots. On top of this, announcements are still to come, in the next few weeks, from Valve on even more plans for the future. Things such as: News regarding AAA titles coming natively to SteamOS in 2014. And, Gabe Newell promises STEAM BOX news next week!!! - At Linuxcon 2013, Newell stated that Valves next step will be to "release some work we've done on the hardware side." Newell said in March, that SteamBox Prototypes will be release in 2013. Check out more on this subject: Steam TimeTech CVG This post has been promoted to an article
  5. Linux Based OS For The TV and Living Room "As we’ve been working on bringing Steam to the living room, we’ve come to the conclusion that the environment best suited to delivering value to customers is an operating system built around Steam itself. SteamOS combines the rock-solid architecture of Linux with a gaming experience built for the big screen. It will be available soon as a free stand-alone operating system for living room machines." - Says Valve This will allow steam to have: Better Graphics Processing - "Game Developers" are already availing themselves to these performance perks "as they target SteamOS for their new releases" You can Stream games from you Windows or Mac system to a SteamOS machine. You will also be able to stream "Music, TV, and Movies" - Valve Says it's "working with many of the media services you know and love." No names yet but we can assume they want to compete with Roku/AppleTV. Plus "Family Sharing" - Announced a few weeks ago, Valve plans to let you have up to 10 friends (you choose) whom can each access your paid games and get their own achievements and their own save slots. On top of this, announcements are still to come, in the next few weeks, from Valve on even more plans for the future. Things such as: News regarding AAA titles coming natively to SteamOS in 2014. And, Gabe Newell promises STEAM BOX news next week!!! - At Linuxcon 2013, Newell stated that Valves next step will be to "release some work we've done on the hardware side." Newell said in March, that SteamBox Prototypes will be release in 2013. Check out more on this subject: Steam TimeTech CVG
  6. Left 4 Dead fans may have something to look forward to based off of a photo taken of an internal change log at Valve's headquarters in Seattle, WA. Check out the enlarged images and see for yourself! Left 4 Dead 3 and Source 2 spotted during tour of Valve's office Published Tuesday, 6 August 2013 By: Wesley Yin-Poole Left 4 Dead 3 and Source 2 were spotted by members of the Dota 2 subReddit during a recent tour of Valve's Seattle office. During the tour a picture was taken of an internal change log, which mentions Left 4 Dead 3 and Source 2. NeoGAF user "CyborgMatt" produced a zoomed in version, which shows the interesting part in all its glory. The appearance of Source 2 - the second iteration of Valve's own game engine - comes as no surprise. Back in November 2012 Valve chief Gabe Newell confirmed the company was working on a new game engine. "We've been working on Valve's new engine stuff for a while, we're probably just waiting for a game to roll it out with," Newell said at the time. Is that game Left 4 Dead 3? In October 2012, Eurogamer asked Valve's Chet Faliszek if he'd like to make a third game in the co-op zombie shooter. "You know, some time down the road," he replied. "Like anything, I would say that to all of our games. So that's not a promise of when or where." But would you like to? we pressed. "I really love working on that series. It's one of my favourite series. It's just so much fun with the characters and the world. I love zombies and I love horror. So, yeah." The original Source engine debuted with Counter-Strike: Source and Half-Life 2 in 2004. Enlarged Image This post has been promoted to an article
  7. Left 4 Dead fans may have something to look forward to based off of a photo taken of an internal change log at Valve's headquarters in Seattle, WA. Check out the enlarged images and see for yourself! Left 4 Dead 3 and Source 2 spotted during tour of Valve's office Published Tuesday, 6 August 2013 By: Wesley Yin-Poole Left 4 Dead 3 and Source 2 were spotted by members of the Dota 2 subReddit during a recent tour of Valve's Seattle office. During the tour a picture was taken of an internal change log, which mentions Left 4 Dead 3 and Source 2. NeoGAF user "CyborgMatt" produced a zoomed in version, which shows the interesting part in all its glory. The appearance of Source 2 - the second iteration of Valve's own game engine - comes as no surprise. Back in November 2012 Valve chief Gabe Newell confirmed the company was working on a new game engine. "We've been working on Valve's new engine stuff for a while, we're probably just waiting for a game to roll it out with," Newell said at the time. Is that game Left 4 Dead 3? In October 2012, Eurogamer asked Valve's Chet Faliszek if he'd like to make a third game in the co-op zombie shooter. "You know, some time down the road," he replied. "Like anything, I would say that to all of our games. So that's not a promise of when or where." But would you like to? we pressed. "I really love working on that series. It's one of my favourite series. It's just so much fun with the characters and the world. I love zombies and I love horror. So, yeah." The original Source engine debuted with Counter-Strike: Source and Half-Life 2 in 2004. Enlarged Image
  8. Paul Pepera, a graphic artist, who recently worked for 343 Studios continues his career at Valve. He has not only produced some of the more memorable works incorporated into Halo 4, but has also worked on Red Orchestra 2 - Heroes of Stalingrad a Tripwire Interactive title and Section 8 - Prejudice a Time Gate Studios title and id Software. Here is a story by Luke Plunkett of Kokatu. Thanks for all your creative work Paul! Having Helped Build Halo 4, He's Now Building Worlds At Valve by : Luke Plunkett/Kokatu I like to think of Paul Pepera's art as the realisation of childhood dreams. Rendering what we imagined our LEGO constructions to be in our heads, not as they actually looked, all clunky and basic and sharp. Now an artist at Valve, Pepera has also worked at places like 343 Studios, id Software and Timegate, on projects such as Halo 4, Section 8 and Red Orchestra 2. There's a selection of his 3D work below, but to see more you can head to his personal site and CGHub page. This post has been promoted to an article
  9. Does anybody play this game? And if you do for PC or Xbox 360... TF2 Is my favorite game besides Halo, and I belive it to be one of the best multiplayer games i have ever played in my days. I've played it so much on xbox that the spy and engineer both have 90 hours of playtime by themselves (only the pyro and medic dont have over a day and they still have over 13 hours of play time from me) I also have the PC version which is fun in the way your able to achieve things more so than the xbox 360. Even though this game is nearly six years old, I'd still recommend this game to anyone looking for the old, Red vs. Blue class based Shakedown...
  10. Valves new game adds, new grenades, polish you would expect for valve and a few upgrades to one of the best games for the pc ever. From: http://www.computera...m/homepage.php? By: Mike Rose Valve's latest FPS does not redefine nor ruin the acclaimed series. This is it, then - the next chapter in one of the greatest first-person multiplayer shooter franchises the PC has to offer, now with added console support. Counter-Strike: Global Offensive tries to emerge from the meteor-sized shadows of the original 2000 Counter-Strike and the 2004 Source follow-up. It aims to satisfy the (often vocal) CS community, while also pulling in as many casual players as possible. It's fair to say that developers Hidden Path and Valve have, to some extent, have succumbed to peer pressure in trying to fulfil these goals. This could have been an altogether new experience in the Counter-Strike collection. It is not. Global Offensive is the same step-up that Counter-Strike Source was from the original 1.6 version. This is not a fully fledged sequel with oodles of new content and dozens of never-seen-before elements. This is Counter-Strike: Source with new visuals and gameplay tweaks. Not that everyone will find this worthy of complaint. This is, after all, exactly what many CS enthusiasts wanted; the result of Valve expertly observing calls from its community and acting on them. The result, ultimately, should be more fittingly named Counter-Strike: Source Redux. It is mash-up of everything that CS has always stood for, but with additional elements that allow new players to enter the fray with less fear of being manhandled by veteran players. If you are such a potential new player, Counter-Strike in a nutshell is this: Two teams vie for control of an enclosed game space. The terrorists will seek to plant a bomb in designated areas, while the counter-terrorists seek to thwart such plans. This is all done with guns and grenades. If you're a big Call of Duty fan, it is likely that Counter-Strike will not sit well with you as much as you expect - at least at first. This is a famously merciless, harsh environment where you can be assassinated before you've even had time to fire off your weapon. Fire fights are usually over within seconds, and the old 'spray and pray' tactic simply does not work. Counter-Strike makes you work to enjoy the content, and you'll have to put many hours of play into it before enjoying the feeling of conquering it. Weapons are a huge part of the series too, with CS:GO not an exception. Each round provides a cash sum based on your previous performance, and with this you can purchase armour, projectiles and weapons. Firearms range from standard assault rifles to shotguns and sniper rifles, and you'll want to experiment with each one to see which works best. What makes Counter-Strike such a popular series - and what will no doubt make CS:GO the next big PC shooter - is the thrill of the ego chase. As you die, often continuously, the frustration is outweighed by an aspiration to do better. In a game where success is pinned on attention to detail, death often triggers an internal failure analysis that the player will mull over while waiting for a new session to load. It becomes a spiral of egging yourself on to do better - and if you become a good player, the game becomes a stage for you to parade your skills. Global Offensive builds on the CS series by going through a significant checklist presented by its community and marking off as many points as possible. Gun game as its own separate mode? Check. Competitive capabilities built in? Check. Map balancing here and there? Check, check, check. As a result, there are numerous upgrades that will adjust gameplay while also making accessibility far better. The wide range of grenades, for example, will likely make play more tactical - laying down incendiary grenades will thwart rushes, while decoys, which fake gunfire and fool radar points, are brilliant tools for messing with the minds of established players. The actual core shooting will be a huge talking point for many months to come. It has been tinkered slightly and gives weapons a noticeably floaty feel, which doesn't sit well to begin with. We eventually found ourselves enamoured by it, and the impact of hits add a real tactile distinction to play. It's what doesn't work, however, that is most notable. Regular mode has no new maps added to it, while all the new guns seem somewhat cosmetic. Global Offensive has also removed some of its middling weapons such as the MP5, essentially pushing even more players to stick with the AK and the M4. Sometimes it gives the impression that there is in fact less valuable content than in previous CS releases. If one assumed this was Counter-Strike Source with a visual mod installed, there would often be little to shake that impression. There's also now a split between casual and competitive servers - however, many players aren't yet aware of the differences, mainly because the distinction isn't made obvious enough. It becomes even more confusing if you join a community server with all hosts of mods installed on it, which have perhaps taken casual mode, turned friendly fire on and essentially made it as close to Source as possible. At times, arranging games in Competitive Mode feels like a chore. Joining a five-on-five war is simple enough, but attempt to lobby up with a group of friends and join a game, and you'll often hit a snag. Myself and a few others tried to find a competitive game with no luck, simply being told that no servers were currently available. When you finally do join, it works fine, but the wait and work required to find a game seems like a drawback. We eventually gave up and resorted to using IRC to find matches, as we would with Source. Counter-Strike: Global Offensive is not the key evolution point that we were hoping for, and the response from the community often reflects this view. On many occasions, other players used phrases such as "same old" to us. This is elementally Counter-Strike Source with some fine-tuning under the bonnet, and Valve appears to have acknowledged this with the reasonable RRP attached to it. And yet the core DNA of the game has not lost its appeal. This is still a glorious experience that sets a benchmark for all multiplayer shooters. Valve's objective with Global Offensive was to draw together the active communities of both the Source and trusty 1.6 edition. It clearly has a good chance. The verdict SCORE 8.0 Counter-Strike: Global Offensive is a great introduction to the renowned shooter series, but veterans may feel there simply isn't enough new material here to justify the encore. CVG UK<p> UPPERS Layers of polish typical of a Valve game Nails the 'just one more go' multiplayer hook New range of grenades are a blast DOWNERS Don't expect too much more than Counter-Strike Source Deluxe Arranging matches in Competitive mode is a chore Er... where's my MP5
  11. Valves new game adds, new grenades, polish you would expect for valve and a few upgrades to one of the best games for the pc ever. From: http://www.computera...m/homepage.php? By: Mike Rose Valve's latest FPS does not redefine nor ruin the acclaimed series. This is it, then - the next chapter in one of the greatest first-person multiplayer shooter franchises the PC has to offer, now with added console support. Counter-Strike: Global Offensive tries to emerge from the meteor-sized shadows of the original 2000 Counter-Strike and the 2004 Source follow-up. It aims to satisfy the (often vocal) CS community, while also pulling in as many casual players as possible. It's fair to say that developers Hidden Path and Valve have, to some extent, have succumbed to peer pressure in trying to fulfil these goals. This could have been an altogether new experience in the Counter-Strike collection. It is not. Global Offensive is the same step-up that Counter-Strike Source was from the original 1.6 version. This is not a fully fledged sequel with oodles of new content and dozens of never-seen-before elements. This is Counter-Strike: Source with new visuals and gameplay tweaks. Not that everyone will find this worthy of complaint. This is, after all, exactly what many CS enthusiasts wanted; the result of Valve expertly observing calls from its community and acting on them. The result, ultimately, should be more fittingly named Counter-Strike: Source Redux. It is mash-up of everything that CS has always stood for, but with additional elements that allow new players to enter the fray with less fear of being manhandled by veteran players. If you are such a potential new player, Counter-Strike in a nutshell is this: Two teams vie for control of an enclosed game space. The terrorists will seek to plant a bomb in designated areas, while the counter-terrorists seek to thwart such plans. This is all done with guns and grenades. If you're a big Call of Duty fan, it is likely that Counter-Strike will not sit well with you as much as you expect - at least at first. This is a famously merciless, harsh environment where you can be assassinated before you've even had time to fire off your weapon. Fire fights are usually over within seconds, and the old 'spray and pray' tactic simply does not work. Counter-Strike makes you work to enjoy the content, and you'll have to put many hours of play into it before enjoying the feeling of conquering it. Weapons are a huge part of the series too, with CS:GO not an exception. Each round provides a cash sum based on your previous performance, and with this you can purchase armour, projectiles and weapons. Firearms range from standard assault rifles to shotguns and sniper rifles, and you'll want to experiment with each one to see which works best. What makes Counter-Strike such a popular series - and what will no doubt make CS:GO the next big PC shooter - is the thrill of the ego chase. As you die, often continuously, the frustration is outweighed by an aspiration to do better. In a game where success is pinned on attention to detail, death often triggers an internal failure analysis that the player will mull over while waiting for a new session to load. It becomes a spiral of egging yourself on to do better - and if you become a good player, the game becomes a stage for you to parade your skills. Global Offensive builds on the CS series by going through a significant checklist presented by its community and marking off as many points as possible. Gun game as its own separate mode? Check. Competitive capabilities built in? Check. Map balancing here and there? Check, check, check. As a result, there are numerous upgrades that will adjust gameplay while also making accessibility far better. The wide range of grenades, for example, will likely make play more tactical - laying down incendiary grenades will thwart rushes, while decoys, which fake gunfire and fool radar points, are brilliant tools for messing with the minds of established players. The actual core shooting will be a huge talking point for many months to come. It has been tinkered slightly and gives weapons a noticeably floaty feel, which doesn't sit well to begin with. We eventually found ourselves enamoured by it, and the impact of hits add a real tactile distinction to play. It's what doesn't work, however, that is most notable. Regular mode has no new maps added to it, while all the new guns seem somewhat cosmetic. Global Offensive has also removed some of its middling weapons such as the MP5, essentially pushing even more players to stick with the AK and the M4. Sometimes it gives the impression that there is in fact less valuable content than in previous CS releases. If one assumed this was Counter-Strike Source with a visual mod installed, there would often be little to shake that impression. There's also now a split between casual and competitive servers - however, many players aren't yet aware of the differences, mainly because the distinction isn't made obvious enough. It becomes even more confusing if you join a community server with all hosts of mods installed on it, which have perhaps taken casual mode, turned friendly fire on and essentially made it as close to Source as possible. At times, arranging games in Competitive Mode feels like a chore. Joining a five-on-five war is simple enough, but attempt to lobby up with a group of friends and join a game, and you'll often hit a snag. Myself and a few others tried to find a competitive game with no luck, simply being told that no servers were currently available. When you finally do join, it works fine, but the wait and work required to find a game seems like a drawback. We eventually gave up and resorted to using IRC to find matches, as we would with Source. Counter-Strike: Global Offensive is not the key evolution point that we were hoping for, and the response from the community often reflects this view. On many occasions, other players used phrases such as "same old" to us. This is elementally Counter-Strike Source with some fine-tuning under the bonnet, and Valve appears to have acknowledged this with the reasonable RRP attached to it. And yet the core DNA of the game has not lost its appeal. This is still a glorious experience that sets a benchmark for all multiplayer shooters. Valve's objective with Global Offensive was to draw together the active communities of both the Source and trusty 1.6 edition. It clearly has a good chance. The verdict SCORE 8.0 Counter-Strike: Global Offensive is a great introduction to the renowned shooter series, but veterans may feel there simply isn't enough new material here to justify the encore. CVG UK<p> UPPERS Layers of polish typical of a Valve game Nails the 'just one more go' multiplayer hook New range of grenades are a blast DOWNERS Don't expect too much more than Counter-Strike Source Deluxe Arranging matches in Competitive mode is a chore Er... where's my MP5
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